New Job, No Stress: Thanks To Hypnosis

A NEW WLTZ EMPLOYEE PUTS HYPNOSIS TO THE TEST, BUT WHAT HE FINDS BRINGS HIM SUCCESS

Meet Bradly Tarver.

He is new to the WLTZ First News team, and wears several hats at the station.

He works in master control and in production.

On the production team, he is a fill in on the morning show as a director.

Tarver is learning fast, but with any new job it can be stressful.

"I felt anxious and stressed when there were a lot of things happening at once. For example, when the producers are talking in your ear and you have to make sure you have the right things cued up. If I don't, I could potentially crash the show," said Tarver.

This is where professional hypnotist, Richard Barker comes in.

Barker is originally from the United Kingdom, but he is now a new United States citizen, living in Florida.

Barker tells Tarver that he can help him.

"Through hypnosis, I can take negative memories and either erase them or clean them up. I like to tidy the thoughts up," said Barker.

At WLTZ, we had ten employees volunteer to try to get hypnotized.

Barker had the volunteers all sit down, face him and he told them: "Just put your feet flat on the floor. Put your legs uncrossed. Now get ready to relax."

With a calm mind, Barker told the volunteers to focus on his voice and sleeping.

"Don't listen to the person sitting next to you. Just listen to the sound of my voice and my voice alone. Allow yourself to totally go and totally relax." said Barker.

In hypnosis, Barker said, it can feel better than a good nap.

Barker said, "Under hypnosis you are giving your mind rest. Typically, one hour of hypnosis can feel like four to six hours of sleep."

One by one, each volunteer became more relaxed, they looked tired and eventually they were hypnotized.

"I want you to imagine your eyes are becoming heavier and heavier and heavier. If you ever hear me say the word sleep. Your eyes will immediately close. You will fall into your chair like a rag doll," said Barker.

The volunteers were in a trance.

While they were in this state, Barker spent time talking with each one of the volunteers.

Specifically, he talked to them about how they wanted hypnosis to improve their health individually.

Barker talking directly with Tarver: "Just for the person I am touching now. I want you to understand that if you feel any self doubt or anxiety, it will all drift away. Those feeling will clear from your memory like a stream. Every day, you will feel better about yourself."

After Barker spoke to each volunteer, he brought them out of hypnosis.

Some of the volunteers stretched and yawned, looking as if they were waking up from a good nap.

As soon as they came out of the trance, I asked Tarver how he felt.

"I feel very focused, calm, and content," said Tarver.

To test his mind-calming experience under hypnosis, we asked Tarver if he felt any different.

Tarver said, "I have noticed I can deal with stress better. Hypnosis has helped me to stay calm and to not press buttons at work that I would not have pressed before I got hypnotized."

Barkers response to Tarver: "The beauty about hypnosis is that it does not discriminate against age, gender or religion. Hypnosis is a free forming experience that puts the magic in your own mind."

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